The ‘Poldark’ novels by Winston Graham

For those of you who have been watching the BBC TV series, and maybe for those of you who haven’t.

The recent BBC TV ‘Poldark’ series has been justifiably popular. (There was an earlier version which I haven’t seen.) Being me, I saw the dramatisation as a way into reading the original novels by Winston Graham. So I did.

Well, I can report, dear reader, that they are very good. Yes, your “very good” may not be the same as mine, but I mean both that they are well written and that I enjoyed them.

For those of you unfamiliar with Poldark, it is the story of two families, set in Cornwall before and after 1800. The historical context seems to be very accurate. It’s certainly very well described and very believable. There is no flinching from the grim realities of poverty and disease: and the latter can strike both rich and poor, with the medicine of the age by and large spectacularly useless.

Poldark 2

The series has some twelve novels, covering the years from 1783 to 1820. I have read up to book 7, ‘The Angry Tide’, matching the development of the TV series. To invest the time and effort in reading a long sequence like this, one must have some sort of feeling for the characters, and Ross Poldark, undoubtedly the hero of the first two thirds, is a character it’s hard not to like: intelligent, tough and principled; probably sexy, if I did but know it. His wife, Demelza, also intelligent, tough (in a different way) and principled, has a rags to riches story. I certainly fell in love with her. Their personalities are of course (that is not sarcastic) interestingly flawed.

Poldark 1There is a strong cast of others: the unprincipled banker, George Warleggan; the forward thinking doctor, Dwight Ennys; and so on, and so on. Perhaps the working class characters are less prominent than the gentry.

I like the interplay and the feuding; I like the detail; and I especially like the way the history intertwines with real lives.

I will be sad when the TV series finishes (after the eighth novel) but I’m happy to think there will be four further books to read. I almost certainly would not have read these if it had not been for the adaptation, which is very faithful to the original. I admit to often having the screen actors in my head when I read. I recommend them to my readers.

Note 1: I have  selected only images I believe to be copyright free, as usual, in the pretence that the BBC and the Poldark publishers care whether or not I use their pictures without permission.

Large picture: Aidan Turner as Ross Poldark from BBC

Small picture: Jack Farthing and Heida Reed, also from BBC TV’s Poldark

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Note 2: I read them on Kindle. They are still in print and also to be found in second-hand shops.

 

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