A Quartet of YA Reviews

For those of you not aware, YA stands for Young Adult: a genre which seems to have made a significant impact recently. Just for the record, I am definitely not a young adult. These books were lent to me by Miss Oblique #1, who as my devoted followers will know, is a young lady of discernment and taste. Nevertheless, I probably would have read stuff like this when I was a young adult, and I find them absorbing.

It is an interesting debating point as to what makes them specifically Young Adult. (Note the capitals.) All these books are really fantasy; I won’t bother to justify the worth of that genre, but refer you to Terry Pratchett’s essays in ‘A Blink of the Screen’. The plots are complex; the writing is of good quality. I suppose a major point is that all the protagonists are young adults. There is some romance, but any sex is understated. I don’t want to over-analyse; they are just good reads.

My reviews are mercifully brief.

‘Wolf by Wolf’ by Ryan Giraudin

3This is an alternative history fantasy. Germany won World War 2. Hitler is still alive. Every year, the youth of Germany and Japan compete in a trans-continental motorcycle race. Yael, a concentration camp survivor and part of the resistance movement, takes the place of a previous winner in a plot to assassinate Hitler.

The book alternates sections in the “present” of the race with sections about the “past” of the concentration camp and what followed. The race parts are believable and engaging. The past is moving and chilling; somehow the fictionalisation makes it very realistic, though I realise I could not possibly imagine the horror of the real historical sources.

Apart from the setting, there is a specific fantasy element, which is surprisingly plausible, and an excellent twist. A sequel, ‘Blood for Blood’, has been published and I look forward to reading it. Recommended.

‘Guns of the Dawn’ by Adrian Tchaikovsky

4This looked pretty standard fantasy fare, but is more impressive. It is set in an alternative world, where a war is raging between the “revolutionaries” of Denland and the monarchists of Lascanne. Eventually women are called up, and the heroine, Emily Marshwic, joins the fighting in the swamps of the Levant. Again there is a specific fantasy element, the “Warlocks”, who are magicians, given their power by the royal touch, who use fire against the enemy.

The contrast between Emily’s genteel home life and the environment of the war is done well. The characters are believable, although some may be a little stereotypical: the fat quartermaster, the “shell-shocked” officer. The plot has some good surprises, with some good political elements and a satisfyingly unpredictable outcome. Parallels with real warfare and history are present, although not over-stated. Romance is portrayed as being complicated, as it usually is.

My only real problem was with the battle scenes. I lost interest in the details; judging from review extracts, I am unusual in this view, and Miss O. tells me it’s a given of this type of book.

It’s great. All along, one has the suspicion that the war and the political situation may not be all they seem, but the denouement is gradual and absorbing.

‘Crooked Kingdom’ by Leigh Bardugo

1This is the sequel to ‘Six of Crows’, a surprisingly good novel again set in a fantasy world, with a limited number of other fantasy elements: powers (exercised by individuals called Grisha) such as tidemaking and healing. There are echoes of Holland in the city where it is set. In the first book, Kaz Brekker, a thief and criminal, assembled a team to trace the source of jurda parem, a substance that magnifies the powers of the Grisha unimaginably. He was double-crossed; now his spy (and suppressed love interest) Inej has been kidnapped and he is being sought by various interested parties. He wants revenge and wants her back. So far, so ordinary? It’s of course more complicated than that, with intricate deals and political intriguing.

I found this as good as the first novel. It’s a believable world, and the “special powers” theme is not overdone. I found the ending moving and there was the suspicion of a tear in my eye. I’m no expert on this genre, but I feel this could comfortably be characterised as a mainstream fantasy novel, rather than specifically Young Adult. It’s probably best to read ‘Six of Crows’ first.

(Note: Miss O. says that the other novels set in this world are not as good.)

‘Traitor to the Throne’ by Alwyn Hamilton

2This is the second book of a trilogy; I have reviewed the first (Rebel of the Sands- Alwyn Hamilton) and raved about it. I had really looked forward to this one, and saved it until the end of this quartet of Miss O. loans. Again, it’s a fantasy world, with other fantasy or “magical power” elements. I admit to being just a little disappointed. Possibly I had over-anticipated. I found there was too much re-establishing of the plot at the beginning and there were too many names, although not to the extent of some adult fantasy. (Can anybody remember all the characters in ‘A Song of Fire and Ice’?) Occasionally the magic powers were employed a little erratically; surely you can defeat anything with such forces? However, once it got into its stride it was captivating and I look forward to the sequel.

Footnote

I suppose underlying this post is a question: why shouldn’t adults read YA books? It’s probably obvious that my answer is that there is no reason at all, just as there is no reason why adults should not read children’s literature.

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